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Citizenship Office – FAQ

Data:

04/03/2019


Citizenship Office – FAQ

Q Where do I have to go to have citizenship recognized and what documentation is required?

A Application for recognition of Italian citizenship must be made to the Italian consular office authorized for the place where you live, which we would suggest that you contact before starting to collect documentation since the documentation required depends on the citizenship history of the family of origin.

In any case, it will be necessary to prove that your ancestor was in possession of Italian citizenship at the time he/she left Italy and maintained it, thereby passing it on to descendants; the birth certificate of that ancestor, which can be requested from the Office of Civil Statistics (Ufficio di Stato Civile) of the city of birth and a document that specifies citizenship (old passport, certificate of historic citizenship, etc.). It will also be necessary, by going back through the generations and through all available records of civil status, to demonstrate the blood relationship between the ancestor and the applicant for citizenship.


Q I am an Italian citizen but am living abroad. If I take another citizenship will I lose my Italian one?

A Since 15 August 1992 the voluntary acquisition of foreign citizenship no longer leads to automatic loss of Italian citizenship, with the exception of citizenship in any of the following States: Austria, Belgium, Denmark, France, Luxembourg, Netherlands and Norway. (France allows for some exceptions in the cases of facilitated naturalization envisaged in the II Amendment Protocol to the Strasbourg Convention of 24.03.1995).


Q I am a foreigner married to an Italian citizen. Am I entitled to Italian citizenship?

A If you are a woman and you married before April 27th, 1983, you automatically acquired Italian citizenship at the moment of marriage. After April 27th, 1983, either husband or wife may acquire Italian citizenship after two years of marriage if the couple resides in Italy and after three years if they reside abroad. In both cases you need to file an application.


Q I became an American citizen by naturalization before August 16th, 1992. Can I reacquire my Italian citizenship?

A Yes, by declaring you intend to do so, and taking up residence in an Italian Comune within one year from such declaration.


Q I became an American citizen after August 15th, 1992. Did I lose my Italian citizenship?

A No. Those who acquired a foreign nationality after the above-mentioned date have retained their Italian citizenship. You can come to the Consulate to register it, presenting your certificate of naturalization, an Italian passport or Italian certificate of birth and American passport or any other valid I.D. No formal declaration is required for those who become American citizens after March 31st, 2001.


Q I was born in the US but I have an Italian direct ascendant. Am I entitled to dual citizenship?

A You might, but this is a case-by-case matter. We need to check the original documents along with you and ascertain if you are eligible or not. Please Note: those who were born before January 1, 1948 may obtain Italian citizenship only through paternal ascendants and ancestors naturalized before June 14 1992 cannot pass on the Italian Citizenship.


Q I was born in the United States, my father was an Italian citizen at the time of my birth and I have never renounced my Italian citizenship. Am I entitled to Italian citizenship?

A Yes.


Q I was born in the United States after January 1, 1948, I have never renounced my Italian citizenship, and my mother was an Italian citizen at the time of my birth. Am I entitled to Italian citizenship?

A Yes.


Q My father was born in the U.S. and my paternal grandfather was an Italian citizen at the time of my father’s birth and neither I nor my father ever renounced Italian citizenship. Am I entitled to Italian citizenship?

A Yes.


Q I was born after January 1, 1948, my mother was born in the United States and my maternal grandfather was an Italian citizen at the time of my mother’s birth and neither I nor my mother ever renounced Italian citizenship. Am I entitled to Italian citizenship?

A Yes.


Q I was born in Italy to non-Italian citizens who were permanent residents of Italy at the time of my birth. Now I live in the United States. Am I eligible to Italian citizenship?

A No. Italian citizenship is based on “jure sanguinis” (blood line). As a general rule, foreigners born in Italy are not automatically Italian.


Q What is the Apostille and where can I get it?

A The “APOSTILLE” is an international legalization. It is not a stamp on the certificate. It is a physical separate document stapled to the birth/marriage/death certificate.

Please note that the “Apostille” does not require translation.

To request the apostille please check on internet:” apostille”, adding the name of the state where the document was issued. For MA, RI, NH, VT and ME please consult Secretary of State Offices

Apostille: U.S. birth/marriage/death records related to the Italian side must bear the Apostille of the Secretary of State of the State where the document was issued (the certificate of naturalization does not require the Apostille).


Q I am an Italian citizen and I naturalized American. Should I inform the Consulate?

A Yes. You may do so by presenting certificate of naturalization, Italian passport or Italian certificate of birth and passport or any other valid I.D. You can also register it by mail, providing certified true copies of the above mentioned documents.


Q How can I require my Italian citizenship?

A If you would like to reacquire your original Italian citizenship in this Consulate in Los Angeles you must have a current residence in this Italian jurisdiction of Los Angeles (please consult our web page). You need to prepare the requirements (check the check list), contact us by e mail losangeles.cittadinanza@esteri.it for an appointment, sign a declaration in the Italian Consulate of Los Angeles (this declaration expires in 1 year) and move to Italy and stay there until the Comune will grant you Italian. The procedure can take a few weeks but it depends on the Comune.


Q I have a dual citizenship, can I renounce Italian citizenship?

A Dual citizens registered in the Registry of Italian Nationals Residing Abroad (AIRE) with this Consulate can renounce Italian citizenship by making a declaration at this Consulate and submitting the appropriate documentation on the day of the appointment. For documentation check the check list.


Q How can I determine if I am eligible for Italian citizenship?

A To determine if you are eligible for Italian citizenship, the Italian Consulate must look at the law that was in effect in Italy at the time of your birth. Individuals can become citizens under several very different sections of law or can automatically lose the citizenship through the naturalization of either of the parents.

If you are claiming citizenship through an Italian citizen mother or grandmother, you must also provide information about your father or grandfather, because Italian citizenship may be affected by the naturalization of their respective spouses.

The following categories may help you find out which one applies to your case:

· Category 1 (direct descent): father born in Italy, Italian citizen at the moment of your birth and you never renounced your right to Italian citizenship.

· Category 2 (direct descent): mother born in Italy, Italian citizen at the moment of your birth - occurred after January 1st 1948 - and you never renounced your right to Italian citizenship.

· Category 3: father born in the United States or other Country (except Italy), your grandfather was Italian at the time of his birth and neither you nor your father ever renounced your right to the Italian Citizenship.

· Category 4: mother born in the United States or other Country (except Italy), your grandfather was Italian at the time of her birth and neither you, born after Jan. 1st 1948 nor your mother ever renounced your right to the Italian Citizenship.

· Category 5: your direct paternal or maternal ancestors were born in the United States from Italian parents and they never renounced their right to Italian citizenship.



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