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Spotlight on Zucchero at the Grammy Museum (February 21, 2013)

Date:

02/22/2013


Spotlight on Zucchero at the Grammy Museum (February 21, 2013)


Italy’s veteran rock star made his way to the Grammy Museum on the occasion of the Los Angeles Italia Film, Fashion and Art Fest, organized by Pascal Vicedomini’s Istituto Capri nel Mondo, on a special night aimed at celebrating his music and his lifetime achievements.

Among the participants at the Grammy Museum, Consul General Perrone made opening remarks stressing Zucchero’s international stature and appeal and his role as an Ambassador of Italian music and style around the world. Music has no boundaries and no borders and is a wonderful way to absorb and understand diverse cultures, indicated the Consul General. “And Zucchero is a quintessential Italian artist who through his work inspired generations of people around the world”, he stated.

Zucchero is back with a new album and direction, paying tribute to the musical sounds of Cuba. On his new album entitled La Sesión Cubana Zucchero explores the sounds of Havana which will be available everywhere February 26th.

As a singer-songwriter, guitarist and keyboardist, Zucchero has collaborated with the royalty of international rock, blues, R&B, jazz and classical music – from Bono, Sting, Iggy Pop and Eric Clapton to Miles Davis, John Lee Hooker and Solomon Burke to Luciano Pavarotti and Andrea Bocelli. The 57-year-old has also won two World Music Awards, six IFPI Europe Platinum Awards and was nominated for a Grammy in 2007. In the video screened during the evening, Sting was quoted as saying; "Every country produces one singer in each generation who represents that country, the way Bruce Springsteen represents America or Bono does Ireland. Zucchero is the Italian voice for everyone in the world". His longstanding collaborator Bono described him by saying; "My friend Zucchero has had Italy singing and dancing for years. . . His boyish smile makes him the most charming man in Italy, that smile that just runs all over his face. But the voice is the sound of aged oak, like an old, oak-aged whisky".

Zucchero



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